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Central banks must work together – or suffer alone

In recent years, the world’s major central banks have pursued unprecedentedly easy monetary policies, characterized by ultra-low and even negative interest rates. These policies are turning out to be a classic bad equilibrium: each central bank stands to gain by keeping interest rates low, but, collectively, low rates constitute a trap from which none can escape, writes Kaushik Basu.

A world without exhaust pipes

The growing popularity of electric vehicles is set to curb one of the largest sources of global pollution. But a consumption bias continues to impede many buyers' embrace of the technology, and until it is addressed, electric mobility will fail to reach its potential, particularly in developing countries, writes Monica Araya.

Six features of the disinformation age

We are living in a brave new world of disinformation and propaganda, and as long as only its purveyors have the data needed to understand it, the responses we craft will remain inadequate.

The mystery of the missing inflation

Since the summer of 2016, the global economy has been in a period of moderate expansion, yet inflation has yet to pick up in the advanced economies. The question that inflation-targeting central banks must confront is straightforward: why? asks Nouriel Roubini.

South Africa’s rhino paradox

South Africa’s recent reversal of a ban on trade in rhinoceros horn has invigorated support for commercial farming of the product. But breeders' argument that a legal market will protect wild populations ignores how the illicit trade in wildlife products actually functions, writes Ross Harvey.

Empowering girls

The effects of practices like female genital mutilation and child marriage on women's health and wellbeing – and that of their children – are no mystery.

The literary magic of Harry Potter

This summer, at literary festivals and bookstores around the world, readers celebrated 20 years since the debut of Harry Potter – and with good reason.